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J M 1 ^ 



J \JOl 




lltQ 7ine -fltt 'Tomato StQedina 

Perfection in anything is a fine art. This holds for the ivork of the poet, the sculptor, 
the athlete, the builder of great ships. All are artists. The same eager expectancy is 
always present as the neivly-created thing takes form and beauty and a new mark is set. 

^YEAR AGO, our firm, with a record of over a half century as general seedsmen, 
decided to devote its entire energy to the Number One American vegetable, the 
Tomato. We are delighted over the decision. The concentration of eflf^ort has 
opened undreamed-of opportunities for study and development. We are beginning 
to learn how little we knew of our chosen line. At once, we are able to lay out a 
comprehensive program of research and production. At once we can surround 
our efiforts with safeguards that come only with adequate planning and with 
thoroughness. 

In plant-breeding, even after months of watching, marking, and measuring, one 
never knows what the progeny will be. The slightest advance in depth- 
to-width ratios, in solidity, in color intensity, or in production, brings untold 
advance in the great mirror of Stokesdale — our customers' growing-fields. 
Thus it is still a deep conviction with us, that it is best to attempt but a 
few things, focusing great energy on them. 

We are sincerely grateful for the encouragement you have given us. In 
return we can already hold out the hope that marked progress may be 
expected year by year. We will do our best to inform you of this progress. 
This Catalog is our talisman for 1937. 

BUSINESS FOUNDED IN 1881 




FRANCIS C. STOKES & COMPANY, Inc. 

Breeders and Growers of Tomatoes 
STOKESDALE PROVING GROUNDS, MOORESTOWN, NEW JERSEY 





Lange's 
Earliana 


Valiant 


Stokesdale 


Bonny 
Best 


Pritchard 


Glovel 


Grothen's 
Globe 


Rutgers 


Master 
Marglobe 


Standard 
Marglobe 


Days to Maturity* 


103 


105 


108 


112 


113 


116 


116 


118 


118 


122 


Aver. Weight in ounces 


5 


6 


8 


5 


5 


7 


7 


8 


6 


7 


Relation Depth-to-Width . . 


75% 


90% 


80% 


86% 


85% 


90% 


85% 


80% 


95% 


80% 


Approximate Outline 


o 





o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 





o 



*These maturity figures have been taken at our Stokesdale Proving Grounds. The time will be shortened as much as 30 days 
for far southern planting and lengthened by 30 days at far northern points. 

12J 

Copyright 1937, F. C. S. & Co.. Inc. 



# # # # 



Besides recording the growth of one of our contract seed crops of Master Marglobe, these photographs once 
again prove that a young Tomato field is one of the very beautiful things on this planet. This crop, grown on High- 
Ian Farm, in our own Burlington County, yielded over 10 tons per acre, and received a grading platform figure of 
80-18-2 — our 1936 top. These photographs, together with a great many others that we publish in this Catalog, 
were made by Rodman B. Allen, grandson of the late S. L. Allen, inventor of Planet Jr. 





[31 



As always, you are cordially invited to 
enter here. Stokesdale Proving Grounds 
is at its best in early August. 




'TltQ Ma^LC tfiQ A/ecQ56at(j T^Lant 





Have We Found It at Last? 




Only the Calibrated Totals Will Tell 



"Tke Plant 

The potentialities here are enor- 
mous. They are almost breath-tak- 
ing in their scope. The choice in 
the progeny plots will aflfect pro- 
duction on 50,000 acres three years 
hence, thus having a marked influ- 
ence on the American Tomato 
industry. Under such multiplica- 
tion, it is not surprising that we 
take our measurements with the 
utmost care. 





And here we get at the heart of things, for here are flavor, color, solids, vitamins, and minerals; 
or, by contrast, the lack of them. Study these interiors. The one on the lower left is the ideal we have 
aimed for in Stokes Master Marglobe. 




Our reading of the single plant is 
completely recorded in a card index 
system. Measurement by calipers 
in millimeters must support the 
field reading. Final acceptance is 
based on the competitive result in 
the completed record. Guessing is 
reduced to a minimum; nearly right 
doesn't go at Stokesdale. 




I/a I I ant — 

A NEW, VERY EARLY, BUT L I G H T - F O L I A G E D VARIETY 



STOKES 
1 93 7 INTRODUCTION 




"^ZALIANT is a word for courage. When you grow this Tomato you will understand why we have given it 

that name. It is indeed truly courageous. How such a small plant can produce Tomatoes of its size and season 
is incredible. To us the word valiant is one of the most beautiful in our language. Here again the Tomato matches 
this beauty. It is extremely well formed; in fact, it approaches Stokes Master Marglobe in perfection and should 
make a good Tomato for the Green- Wrap Trade. 

In season it will mature three days after Earliana and five days ahead of Stokesdale. Therein lies its importance. 

The plant of Valiant is unusually restricted. In this particular it approaches Earliana. The leaf is about one-half 
the size of that of Stokes Master Marglobe. /We were tempted to call it "Naked Indian" after a tree we once saw 
in the Tropics.^ Take careful note of this sparseness of foliage. Do not mature it during the extreme heat of 
midsummer. For winter and spring production in the Far South, for early season production in the North, and for 
greenhouse production any titne we strongly recommend it. 

Our seed supply is seriously restricted. Probably it will not hold out for the season. If the above description 
fits in with any part of your production plans, come to us early in the year and give it a fair trial. Keep this in mind: 
Valiant is a smooth, handsome, modern-type Tomato competing seriously with the main Earliana harvest. Its 
direct relation to Stokesdale indicates an unusually solid interior. 

Valiant will open your season brilliantly, profitably, and on time. You will like it immensely. 

Price, Postpaid: Trade pkt. $1; V4OZ. $1.75/ V20Z. $3; oz. $5; VxWi. $17.50 



SUMMARY FOR VALIANT: 

Days to maturity at Stokesdale: 107. 

Germination: 95' f. 

Date of test: December, 1936. 

Disinfection: Mercuric Chloride. 

Ratio of depth to width: 90*^. 

Interior: Very solid. 

Color: Intense scarlet. 

Average weight of fruit: 6 ounces. 



SUMMARY FOR STOKESDALE: 

Days to maturity at Stokesdale: 112. 

Germination: 96*^ or better. 

Date of test: December, 1936. 

Disinfection: Mercuric Chloride, 1 to 2,000. 

Ratio of depth to width: 80'vf . 

Interior: Remarkably solid. 

Color: Intense scarlet. Ripens from inside out. 
Average weight of fruit: 8 ounces. 



161 



STOKES 
1 936 INTRODUCTION 



NEW LAST YEAR. EARLIER AND LARGER THAN MARGLOBE 




STOKESDALE is proving worthy of its name. Although now only in its fifth generation and requiring at least 
one more year for final fixing of type, it already has demonstrated its remarkable strength. It will mature with 
the Bonny Best class, and that means a week to ten days ahead of Marglobe. In size will range two to three ounces 
larger than Marglobe. It is comparatively free from stem-end crack. What slight cracks do develop are of the 
concentric type. Its production is remarkable. Like Rutgers, it ripens from the inside out which is helpful on 
the Government Grading platform. Its rare flavor is a distinct asset. 

Because of the unusual heat of July, 1936, we do not have a final judgment on its vine coverage. It did not 
stand the 145° field temperatures as well as Marglobe. As a result, our Proving-Ground selections have been 
made toward slightly heavier foliage. /'Obviously too vegetative a growth means much later maturity At the 
U. S. Department of Agriculture Plant Breeding Station at Beltsville, Md., and in a test-plot in the Northern Neck 
of Virginia, conducted by the University of Virginia, Stokesdale did not survive in the soils which were heavily 
infected with Fusarium Wilt. Otherwise, various experiment stations report disease-resistant factors about equal 
to Marglobe. 

Stokesdale is enthusiastically recommended to growers who can profit either by a quick-maturing Tomato, 
or who, because of high latitude or altitude, must have a Tomato that will ripen in a short season. This, obviously, 
makes Stokesdale important in our northern-tier states and in Canada, where full crops of Stokes Master Marglobe 
usually cannot develop. The St. Catharines, Ontario, Trial-Grounds of Stokes Seeds Ltd. gave a convincing demon- 
stration of the importance of Stokesdale for the North. Favorable reports have also come to us from as far South 
as Florida and Texas. If you did not plant Stokesdale in 1936, we urge that you give it consideration this year. 
Obviously, no Tomato is suitable to all conditions, but this has made a lot of money for some of our customers. 
Price, Postpaid: Trade pkt. 25 cts./ oz. $1; y^\\i. $2.75; lb. $10. 



StokeidaU—1938 "Tl 



Proving-Ground stock for the experts, the premium seekers, and the breeders. This gives you the 1938 model 
one year in advance. It is one of the most distinguished Tomato types we have ever produced. Price, Postpaid: 
Trade pkt. $1,- V40Z. $1.50; Vaoz. $2.75; oz. $5. 



17} 



Stoked Ma5tQt Mat^lolfQ INTRODUCTION 

THE NO. 1 TOMATO FOR THE GREEN-WRAP TRADE 

Stokes Master Marglobe is generally conceded to be one of the great varieties. It is now in its thirteenth generation 
of selection and has been developed over a nine-year program. Its present wide acceptance comes as a result of 
the most detailed planning, supported by thoroughness and care in developing these plans. It has required 364 
acres — all Government Certified — for the production of our 1937 seed supply. We have never had enough seed. 

Almost any good thing is imitated by those who are unwilling to lay their own groundwork. Planters desiring 
the genuine Stokes Master Marglobe must look for it in our special tamper-proof container which is here illus- 
trated. For your protection, and for the protection of our own heavy investment, — running well into five figures, — 
the name Stokes Master Marglobe is now guarded by a registered trade-mark. 

The 1936 season has further shown the dominant place this variety holds in the industry. At one of the New 
York Tomato auctions we recently visited, a block of Stokes Master Marglobe sold for the record price of $7.25 
per lug. That, of course, is exceptional, but day after day this strain brought the high money. When a variety can 
make such a showing in the most competitive market in the world, there must be strength behind it. 

Stokes Master Marglobe has been bred both as a shipping and as a manufacturing Tomato. Both require heavy 
production, and that has been our first consideration. No Tomato can now attain full success on the large northern 
markets unless it has depth and interior solidity. The consumer rightly demands that extra slice, and the tradesman 
rightly demands keeping quality. 

The manufacturer of Tomatoes must have a raw product high in solids, low in mold count, and pleasing in 
flavor. These are assured in Stokes Master Marglobe by its interior structure, its freedom from blossom-end scar, 
and a richness of taste that has seldom been equaled. Production 
figures in excess of 16 tons per acre were attained with the variety 

in New Jersey in the 1936 crop, this regardless of a loss of at least SUMMARY: 

2 tons per acre during the July heat-wave. Trade-Mark Registered. Use of name prohib- 

Price, Postpaid: Trade pkt. 25 cts.,- oz. 50 cts.; V4lb. $1 .50; lb. $5 n"^V° """f^T^ft^l ^ 1 1« 
' ^ ^ ' I I Days to maturity at Stokesdale: 118. 

A r^DAMn rnMATn Certified 1936 by N.J. Dept. of Agric. 

A (jKANU lUMAlU Germination: 95% or better. 

Date of test: December, 1936. 
Disinfeaion: Mercuric Chloride, 1 to 2,000. 
Ratio of depth to width: 95%. 
Interior: Completely coreless, heavy in solids. 
Color: Brilliant scarlet when ripe. 
Average weight of fruit: 6 ounces. 






BEWARE OF 
SUBSTITUTES 

Stokes Master Mar- 
globe is sold only in 
this package. 



★ TRADE-MARK 
REGISTERED 



For sheer beauty, for perfection of form, and for that "extra slice," we know of no variety that can 
equal Stokes Master Marglobe, now in its thirteenth plant generation. See also front and back covers. 



{8} 



CflQQnkou5Q T'Otcin^ Attain Mo. 6-87 

A SELECTION OUT OF STOKES MASTER MARGLOBE 



PACK "U. S. NO. 1" QUALITY 



(STOKES 1 93 5 INTRODUCTION) 

C TRAIN No. 6-87 is a refined type of Stokes Master 
^ Marglobe, averaging 5 ounces per fruit. An in- 
creasing number of our customers report marked 
success with this strain under glass. There are three 
definite points in its favor: /'l^ It is an easy setting, and 
therefore, heavy producing variety. {2} It develops 
fruit of a size that is popular with the housewife in 
winter, (i) The interior Master structure is ideal for 
salads. 

Place at a distance of 18 inches in the bench and 
prune to one runner. Under normal conditions of 
temperature, sunlight, and fertilization, production of 
from 10 to 12 pounds per plant is not unusual. All 
of this seed has been produced on our Stokesdale 
Proving Grounds. Price, Postpaid: Trade pkt. $1; ^^oz. 
$1.75; V20Z. $3; oz. $5; V4lb. $17.50. 

WE SEAL IN ALL THE GOODNESS 




Pack perfect Tomatoes. Avoid cracks. 




Here is the new tamper-proof package for Stokes Master 
Marglobe — a final protection to the planter. Both the name 
and the label are protected by copyright. 



Pack 6x6 Tomatoes. Avoid gems. 
Start right. Plant Stokes Master Marglobe. 



(91 



(ftotken 6 Globe ,932' ORIGINATION 

A SINGLE PLANT DEVELOPMENT OUT OF BREAK O'DAY 

' I ^HIS Tomato has made many friends, especially on 
the lower east coast of Florida where the trade re- 
quired a larger Tomato than apparently was available 
under their conditions for Marglobe. Grothen's Globe 
has been particularly profitable there for the fall crop. 
Although, generally speaking, it has nowhere near the 
perfection of form of Stokes Master Marglobe, the size 
factor has been greatly in its favor, and many of the larger 
growers have found Grothen's Globe to be very profitable. 
In season it is slightly earlier than Marglobe. Its vine- 
growth is distinctly more open. 

The stock we offer has been grown in Pennsylvania and 
has been certified by the Pennsylvania State Department 
of Agriculture. We look on it as the best available type 
of Grothen's Globe. 

Price, Postpaid: Trade pkt. 15 cts.; oz. 40 cts./ 
V4lb. $1.50; lb. $5 



SUMMARY: 



Days to maturity at Stokesdale: 
116. 

Certified by Pa. Dept. of Agric. 

Germination: 90%. 

Date of test: December, 1936. 



Ratio of depth to width: 85%. 
Interior solidity: Quite good. 
Color: Brilliant scarlet when 
ripe. 

Average weight of fruit: 7 
ounces. 




GRO 1 iii :s S GLOBE 



A PROMISING PINK-FRUITED TOMATO OF THE MARGLOBE TYPE 



U. S. DEPT. OF AGRICULTURE 
1 936 INTRODUCTION 



Glovel has been developed from the same F.J. Pritchard cross of Livingston's Globe X Marvel, which was the 
Marglobe parentage. Glovel has been perfected by Mr. William S. Porte, of the Bureau of Plant Industry, fol- 
lowing out one of the pink lines instead of scarlet. The present result is a Tomato slightly earlier than Marglobe, 
with a slightly more open vine and with, perhaps, even greater disease-resistance. Some growers have reported 
Glovel to be slightly larger than Marglobe and a little heavier yielder. It is new to most of the trade and has, 

as yet, not had wide acceptance. The 
stock we offer has been grown in 
Pennsylvania and certified by the 
Pennsylvania State Department of 
Agriculture. It is a pure type of Glovel 
and one which can be very highly 
recommended. 

The average resistance of firm, ripe 
Glovel fruits to crushing stresses was 
13.4 pounds, slightly higher than for 
Marglobe. Glovel developed color in 
70° F. on ratio of 72% as 




49' c 



for Marglobe at end of 



storage at 
against 
one week. 

Price, Postpaid: Trade pkt. 25 cts. 
oz. 50 cts.; V4lb. $1 .75; lb. $6 

SUMMARY: 

Days to maturity at Stokesdale: 116. 
Certified by Pa. Dept. of Agric. 
Germination: 90%. 
Date of test: December, 1936. 
Ratio of depth to width: 90%. 
Interior: Coreless, heavy in solidity. 
Disease-resistance: Very high. 
Color: Pink. 

Average weight of fruit: 7 ounces. 



This photo of Glovel 
through courtesy of 
I. N. Click & Sons 



U. S. DEPT. OF AGRICULTURE 
1931 INTRODUCTION 



THE LAST ORIGINATION OF A GREAT PLANT BREEDER 



WE HAVE a wholesome respect for the Pritchard 
Tomato. Under certain growing conditions, this 
variety far outyields all others. This particularly applies 
to New York and to New England where Marglobe 
ordinarily does not ripen a full crop. In maturity, 
Pritchard will average five days ahead of Marglobe. 

Pritchard, a Marglobe X Cooper's Special hybrid, 
originally introduced by the U. S. Department of Agri- 
culture as Scarlet Topper, was officially renamed by the 
Department to honor its originator, the late Dr. Fred J. 
Pritchard. His originations in wilt-resistant types have 
had a vast influence on Tomato production in the United 
States. 

Pritchard is a plant of the determinate growth type 
and because of this it is highly desirable to feed it heavily 
in order to develop as heavy vine as possible. We recom- 
mend that ammonia in some available form should be 
applied before the fruits develop. Reasonable vine pro- 
tection is very desirable. Price, Postpaid: Trade pkt.10 cts.; 
oz. 35 cts.; V4lb. $1 .25; lb. $4. 

SUMMARY: 




PRITCHARD 



Days to maturity at Stokesdale: 
113. 

Germination: 85%, or better. 
Date of test: December, 1936. 
Disease-resistance: High. 



Ratio of depth to width: 85%. 
Interior: Solid. 
Color: Scarlet when ripe. 
Average weight of fruit: 5 ozs. 



N. J. EXPERIMENT STATION'S 
1935 INTRODUCTION 



utaeu 

THIS CANNERY VARIETY IS ENJOYING WIDE ACCEPTANCE 



Rutgers is a Marglobe X J- T. D. hybrid. The original cross was made by Campbell Soup Company and later 
developed by Professor Schermerhorn, of the New Jersey Experiment Station. It is now in its seventh generation 
of selection, and the type is well fixed. Its habit of ripening from the inside out has proved an asset, especially 
in the manufacture of Tomato special- 
ties — juice, soup, catsup, etc. This is 
on account of its high color values. 
Some of our Green- Wrap customers 
have reported success with Rutgers. 
Primarily, we look on it as a variety 
for manufacture. 

Rutgers shares the same season as 
Marglobe, but is distinctly larger than 
that variety. When overfed, Rutgers 
will develop a heavy vegetative growth 
often resulting in over-grown, rough 
fruit. This can be controlled by with- 
holding nitrates in the fertilizer appli- 
cation. The vine-growth is erect and 
vigorous and the plant highly wilt- 
resistant. Price, Postpaid: Trade pkt. 
10 cts.; oz. 35 cts.; V4lb. $1; lb. $3.50. 

SUMMARY: 

Days to maturity at Stokesdale: 118. 
Certified 1936 by N. J. Dept. of Agric. 
Germination: 92% or better. 
Date of test: December, 1936. 
Ratio of depth to width: 80%. 
Interior: Solid. 

Color: Intense scarlet. Ripens from inside out. 
Average weight of fruit: 8 ounces. 

This photo of Rutgers 
through courtesy of 
Prof. Schermerhorn 




JlanijQ6 2atUana ,,,, n't^oduct on 

ITS WIDE ACCEPTANCE IS DUE TO HEAVY CROWN-SET 




SUMMARY: 

Days to maturity at Stokesdale: 105. 
Germination: 95% or better. 
Date of test: December, 1936. 
Disinfection: Mercuric Chloride, 1 to 2,000. 
Ratio of depth to width: 75%. 
Interior: Open. 

Color: Light scarlet when ripe. 
Average weight of fruit: 5 ounces. 



CPARKS' EARLIANA was introduced by Johnson & 
^ Stokes, our honored forebears, in 1900. For over 
30 years this variety has held a respected position as the 
leader of the extra-early class. Some five years ago our 
Gloucester County neighbor, Mr. Ernest Lange, found a 
plant in his Earliana field vv^hich had developed an un- 
usually heavy crow^n setting. Mr. Lange saved this seed, 
and, after making further selections, sold the introduc- 
tory rights to our Company. 

The unusual success of the variety is obviously due to 
the fact that fully half of the crop is available during the 
first 10 days of harvest. The photograph below^ tells the 
story better than we can. This crop was set out in 
Gloucester County, New Jersey, the first week in May. 
The first ripe Tomato was gathered on June 17. The first 
five baskets were gathered on June 22, and thereafter 50 
to 100 baskets were gathered daily. It is not at all un- 
common for the crown-set to carry 6 to 12 fully developed 
fruits. Lange's Earliana is still an Earliana. It nevertheless 
is a fine representative of its class. 

Price, Postpaid: Trade pkt. 15 cts./ V20Z. 40 cts.; 
oz. 75 cts./ V4lb. $2.75; lb. $10 

STOKES TOMATO INTRODUCTIONS 

Atlantic Prize 1889 Master Marglobe . . . 1930 

Spark's Earliana. ... 1900 Stokesdale 1936 

Bonny Best 1908 Valiant 1937 






The Lange Strain of Earliana has consistently topped the market in the Swedesboro, N. J., area for the past four years. 



{12} 



STOKES 
1908 INTRODUCTION 



THE ORIGINAL TYPE AS INTRODUCED BY WALTER P. STOKES 

IN 1908, when Walter P. Stokes introduced Bonny Best, 
it promptly found a place of importance as it was a dis- 
tinct improvement over the older Chalk's Jewel in both 
earliness and depth. Bonny Best held its place staunchly 
until about 192 5 when the more modern and more disease- 
resistant Marglobe began to be widely accepted. From that 
time its acreage fell off, except in the North where its type 
still predominates over all other sorts, and where the loss 
from Fusarium Wilt is about at the zero point. 

We are very fortunate in being able to offer this present 
strain. Bonny Best-Stokes is an almost exact replica of the 
original introduction of twenty-nine years ago. In our 
opinion, it may lead to a definite revival of the variety. 
What we offer here is a Tomato earlier, deeper, and 
smoother, with thick walls which are remarkably free from 
cracks. The color and the flavor are of the fine old Bonny 
type. The average weight — five ounces — is distinctly larger 
than most strains of Bonny in recent years. 

Price, Postpaid : Trade pkt. 10 cts.,- oz. 35 cts./ 
V4lb. $1.25; lb. $4 



SPECIAL GREEN- 
HOUSE STRAIN 



This seed, grown in the North and saved with the greatest 
care by our own men, represents what to us is the finest 
stock of Bonny Best we have ever known. The type is large, 
round, solid, and very productive. Except on Fusarium- 
infected soils, it will make a very profitable type for the 
greenhouse. It supersedes our Super-Standard Bonny Best. 

Price, Postpaid: Trade pkt. $1; V40Z. $1.75; V20Z. $2.75; 
oz. $5; V4lb. $17.50 




BONNY BEST -STOKES 
SUMMARY: 

Days to maturity at Stokesdale: 112. 
Germination: 90% or better. 
Date of test: December, 1936. 
Ratio of depth to width: 86%. 
Interior: Remarkably solid. 
Resistance to Fusarium Wilt: Slight. 
Color: Brilliant scarlet. 
Average weight of fruit: 5 ounces. 




This vigorous seed-field of Special Greenhouse Strain of Bonny Best-Stokes performed brilliantly. 
We have never seen quality to equal it. This photo taken in Wayne Co., N. Y., September, 1936. 

{13 1 



BREAK O'DAY 

Days to maturity at Stokesdale: 112. Introduced by: U. S. Dept. 
of Agric. Average weight: 8 ounces. Color: Orange-red, easily 
sunburned. Ratio of depth to width: 85%. Disease-resistance: 
Good. Vine coverage: Only fair. Place in production: Early 
market. Price, Postpaid: Trade pkt. 10 cts.; oz. 35 cts.,- Vi'b. $1; 
lb. $3.50. 

NVSTATE 

Days to maturity at Stokesdale: 115. Originated by: Geneva 
^N. Y .} Experiment Station. Average weight: 5 ounces. Color: 
Scarlet. Ratio of depth to width: 80%. Vine coverage: Light. 
Has been developed for New York State conditions — for both 
market and manufacturing. Price, Postpaid: Trade pkt. 15 cts.,- 
oz. 60 cts.; i/4!b. $2; lb. $7. 

JOHN BAER (Geneva Strain) 

Days to maturity at Stokesdale: 115. Originated by: Geneva 
jfN. Y.} Experiment Station, as larger and heavier strain of John 
Baer type. Average weight: 5 ounces. Color: Scarlet. Ratio of 
depth to width: 80%. Vine coverage: Good. Especially recom- 
mended for New York and New England. We have saved this 
stock in northern New York. Price, Postpaid: Trade pkt. 10 cts.; 
oz. 30 cts.; V4lb. 85 cts.; lb. $3. 

LIVINGSTON'S GLOBE 

Days to maturity at Stokesdale: 116. Introduced by: Livingston, 
1905, and still an important shipping strain. Average weight: 
6 ounces. Color: Pink. Ratio of depth to width: 82%. Vine 
coverage: Good but open. It is not wilt-resistant. Although 
largely replaced by Marglobe types, handsome profits are still 
made from Globe. Price, Postpaid: Trade pkt. 10 cts.; oz. 40 cts.; 
V4lb. $1.10; ib. $4. 



GULF STATE MARKET 

Days to maturity at Stokesdale: 116. Introduced by: Ferry. Has 
wide acceptance in Texas, Louisiana, and Missouri. Very similar 
to Globe, but apparently is freer from stem-crack. Average 
weight: 6 ounces. Ratio of depth to width: 82%. Not wilt- 
resistant. Vine coverage: Good but open. Price, Postpaid- 
Trade pkt. 10 cts.; oz. 40 cts.; ^Alb. $1.10; lb. $4. 

STANDARD MARGLOBE 

Days to maturity at Stokesdale: 122. Introduced by: U. S. Dept. 
of Agric. ,1925. The most widely grown variety in the United 
States and the most important of Dr. F. J. Pritchard's originations. 
Color: Scarlet. Highly wilt-resistant. Average weight: 7 ounces. 
Ratio of depth to width: 80%. Four days later than Stokes Master 
Marglobe. Larger and flatter. Vine coverage: Heavy. Price, 
Postpaid: Trade pkt. 10 cts.; oz. 25 cts.; Vilb. 75 cts.; Ib. $2.50. 

GREATER BALTIMORE 

Days to maturity at Stokesdale: 12 5. Introduced by: Bolgiano, 
of Baltimore, as earlier and deeper Stone. Largely used for 
manufacturing. Ratio of depth to width: 75% — too flat for market. 
Average weight: 8 ounces. Not disease-resistant. Does best on 
limestone soils. Color: Scarlet. Vine coverage: Good. Price, 
Postpaid: Trade pkt. 10 cts.; oz. 25 cts.; V4lb. 75 cts.; Ib. $2.50. 

STONE 

Days to maturity at Stokesdale: 130. Introduced by: Livingston 
in 1889, but still usually sold as New Stone. Vine heavier than 
Baltimore f often too heavy^. Not wilt-resistant. Very slow in 
maturity — requires long season. Ratio of depth to width: 75%. 
Often develops blossom-end scars. Present use almost solidly 
for manufacturing. Price, Postpaid: Trade pkt. 10 cts.; oz. 25 cts.; 
i/4lb. 75 cts.; Ib. $2.50. 

Weather permitting, we still prefer sun-drying of our seed. It is placed on these racks for dry- 
ing and rubbing, immediately after receiving its disinfecting bath in bichloride of mercury 
f 1 to 2,0007- The loyalty of our company workers is our greatest asset. We have no more 
devoted men on our force than the three shown here. 




StolcQ5 tomato ^uicc l5 Mad^ -I^Qta 




Our Vincentown Plant will handle the product of 600 pedij<reed acres of Stokes Master Marglobe in 
1937. No other variety will go through the Plant. The entire acreage will be inspected for Govern- 
ment Certification, the tonnage is accepted on Government Grade and the Plant is under constant 
Government Inspection. Too much Government in business.' No. We like it. You are invited to 
make your own inspection, too. August is the best month. 




Constant sampling in the cook-room insures a uniform 
product. 



Eight o'clock Tomatoes are canned, cooked, cooled, labeled, 
boxed, and sometimes shipped by nine o'clock. 




Stokes Tomato Juice, like its twin brother, Stokes Tomato Seed, is a quality product, and is making 
a host of new friends each season. The 1936 pack is already completely sold.